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Webb City offers a variety of entertaining events to witness as well as places to visit through a wide range of outdoor activities in natural and beautiful settings.

 

PARKS

KING JACK PARK, 555 S Main

  • Georgia City Bridge, one of Missouri’s oldest steel bridges.  Brought to Webb City in 1996 and set in place in 2006 joining with the King Jack Park walking trail.  The bridge was transported from Georgia City, where it was erected in 1871.
  • Jeannie, The Number One Gun of Battery B, Jeannie, a 105mm howitzer, played a lead role in the 79th Division’s liberation of France in World War II.  A commemorative plaque illustrates the crew and the gun’s operation.
  • Kneeling Miner Statue, The 10 foot tall Kneeling Miner, created by Webb City artist Jack Dawson, commemorates the city’s early 20th century history of lead mining.
  • Old Streetcar No. 60, the fully restored 1893 streetcar rumbles around the tracks in King Jack Park the second Saturday of the month from 9 am – Noon and also by appointment for birthdays, anniversaries or reunions. 
  • Praying Hands, a wonderful statue by artist Jack Dawson. Built in 1974 and dedicated during Webb City’s Centennial in 1976.  The statue is a reminder of “Hands in Prayer, World at Peace”.  The statue is known worldwide.  The flag was donated by a local family.
  • Streetcar Depot, The old Prosperity Junction streetcar depot has been reconstructed at the entrance to King Jack Park, next to the re-laid tracks.  It houses a display on the Southwest Missouri Electric Railway.
  • Webb City Farmers Market, Year-round award winning farmers market. Held every Tuesday and Friday from 11 am - 2 pm, April - September.  Saturday Farmer's Market will be held every Saturday from 9 am - Noon year round.  Under the pavillions in King Jack Park.

 

MEMORIAL PARK, Daugherty & Ball Streets

  • World War II Memorial bears the names of those Webb City service men and women who lost their lives in our wars.

 

Four other city parks are equipped with playground equipment and some sport volleyball and basketball courts and picnic areas with barbecue grills.

 

  • Webb City High School pool and tennis courts are open to the public during the summer months.
  • Millennium Tennis & Fitness Club, a world-class tennis and fitness center. 
  • Range Line Golf Course, a lighted nine-hole executive golf course.
  • Skateland of Webb City

 

Additional activities for the youth of our city are cheerleading, basketball, a dance studio and Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts.

 

It’s thrilling to be in the stands at Cardinal Stadium on game nights when the large, enthusiastic crowds give testimony to the community’s pride in Fighting Cardinals football team who always field winning teams, many state champions.

 

 

 

POINTS OF INTEREST

 

The Clubhouse Museum, Built in 1910 as the clubhouse employees of the Southwest Missouri Electric Railway Company, the museum now house Webb City History.  Tours by appointment contact 417-673-5866, 115 N Madison.

 

Mount Hope Cemetery, an outdoor chapel and Veteran’s Memorial inscribed with the names of the 77 Missouri Congressional Medal of Honor recipients is located at 3700 Range Line Rd.

 

Route 66 Lakeside Mural, in his second Route 66 mural, artist John Biggs portrays vintage automobiles and motorcycles in a rural setting just east of Webb City. Of special interest in the Lakeside Route 66 mural is the bridge constructed in 1922. The 8-foot by 16-foot mural hangs in the Route 66 Visitors Center and Chamber of Commerce office at the corner of Webb Street and Broadway.

 

Route 66 Mural, mural of highlights along Route 66 located on the Bruner Pharmacy building at Main and Broadway.

 

Route 66 Theater, A renovated, nostalgic theater from the era of Route 66.  Family entertainment featuring a different movie each week, located at 24 S Main.

 

Webb City Public Library, One of the few Andrew Carnegie libraries still being used.  The new addition to the library blends well with the existing building.  The building exterior has samples of the lead and zinc mined in this area.  It is located at 101 Liberty.

 

Webb City Mural, The 30-foot oil mural depicting 100 years of Webb City history is on permanent display in one of the city’s oldest businesses, Mid-Missouri Bank, during business hours.

 

Webb City Farmers Market Mural, Lead muralist Kyle McKenzie, a Webb City native, raised donations for the project through Kickstarter. The mural, on the north wall of the Middlewest Building at Main Street and Broadway, depicts a moment when the market is being set up, before the shoppers arrive. It shows a large, grassy field leading into the market pavilion, where vendors are unloading their goods. Also included are the Children’s Community Garden and the bell that is rung to signal the market’s opening. He sought input on the design from farmers market vendors and shoppers, and invited volunteers to help paint the mural. 

 

EVENTS

 

Arts in the Park –an event in the fall featuring music, dance, visual arts and kids activities and has two primary purposes – to bring the arts to Webb City.  This event will be held the second Saturday in September 9 am – Noon in King Jack Park and is hosted by the Webb City Farmers Market.

 

Citywide Garage Sale – This event is held the first weekend in May and all permit fees are waived.  To place to on the garage sale map contact the Webb City Sentinel at 417-673-2421 to place your ad. 

 

Easter Egg Hunt Annual Easter Egg Hunt is held the Saturday before Easter starting at 1:00 PM at King Jack Park (next to Tennis Courts). This event is hosted by the Webb City Parks Department.

 

Route 66 Cruise Night - This event is held the second Saturday of the month from April – September, from 5:00 – 8:00 pm Downtown Webb City.  Downtown car show, classics, antiques & more.

 

Polar Bear Express – The streetcar will be decorated for Christmas, and a polar bear will see the streetcar off and pose for pictures. While visitors wait for their train ride, they can visit a large tent where children can color sheets from “The Polar Express,” visit with Santa Claus and drink hot chocolate. Several scenes along the streetcar’s route will be decorated to look like the North Pole This event is held two weekends in December.  This is event is hosted by the Webb City Parks Department.

 

Southwest Showcase of Show Choirs - When the Webb City Singers of the high school host their Southwest Showcase of Show Choirs the first Saturday in November, it’s “Broadway” in Webb City.  This is a statewide competition open to the public held at the Ronald Barton Performing Arts Center.

 

Springtime on Broadway - The fifth annual Springtime on Broadway festival takes place April  11th & 12th, 2014, when Downtown fills up with vendors, games, live music and a carnival. For more information contact Erin Braker 417-673-1154 or e-mail ebraker@webbcity.org.

 

Webbstock - It’s music, music, music in the autumn each year when the Cardinal Pride high school band hosts their Webbstock band festival late in September. The community is justly proud of the “Marching Cardinal Pride” who were invited to the Tournament of Roses Parade in 2006 and again in 2010.  This is a statewide competition open to the public.

HISTORY

 

Our roots are literally in the ground. John Webb, for whom the city is named, plowed up a large chunk of lead ore one day in 1875 and from there sprang one of the richest lead and zinc mining areas in the world, and this city. A bit of the history of the town can be read on its street signs and buildings, Aylor, Ball, Chinn, Daugherty and Webb. The city was established in the year 1876, the year of the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

 

Having birthed as a boomtown, much needed to be done in a hurry to provide services to the miners and their families. The mine owners were up to the task and a business district, hotels and banks, homes and even a hospital were built. Soon transportation became an issue; then entered A. H. Rogers’ mule drawn streetcar, soon to grow into an interstate electric streetcar enterprise. Legend has it that when Webb City’s mayor was approached for right-of-way for the electric system, he was concerned that Webb City residents would use it to go to Joplin to do their shopping so he required the headquarters of the new system to be located in Webb City. The deal was struck and Webb City became the hub of the streetcar line, with offices, power house and car barns located on Madison Street between Broadway and Daugherty streets. The company built a clubhouse for their employees’ use.  This part of town soon became a second business district with cafes, grocery stores, and some light industry. Many young men, as they left for war and whose names would appear on the tablets in Memorial Park, said goodbye to their loved ones at the Frisco Station at Daugherty and Madison.

But the grass is sometimes greener and richer lodes of lead were found in Oklahoma, and eventually the mining ceased; then mass production of automobiles and buses brought an end to the streetcar era. At that time an active Chamber of Commerce and concerned businessmen used their combined acumen to bring in new business and industry and for a time the city thrived. However, changing times and business practices brought near ruin to most central business districts and Webb City was no exception, although the newer business district on South Madison Avenue continued to grow. Recent years have seen an explosion of new businesses there, with new restaurants, retail establishments and offices.  

 

We love it here.  We think you will too.

 

Neighborhoods

Any Webb City local will gladly tell you that pleasant neighborhoods and friendly neighbors are a part of a rich hometown tradition.  The school district’s fine reputation, the attraction of small town life, safe neighborhoods, almost non-existent crime and low cost of living all contribute to driving the demand for Webb City housing.  A recent housing construction boom reflects the city’s growth in recent years.

 

A Webb City housing renaissance began in the late 1980’s with the creation of several new developments. There are currently many new housing developments in various stages of construction in Webb City and the surrounding areas. Older neighborhoods are also experiencing a new construction boom.  In several locations throughout the city and in adjoining areas attractive new homes in beautifully planned settings brighten and highlight the quieter portions of town.  In established neighborhoods, pride is evident as homeowners beautify and upgrade their properties.

 

The history of a town is often reflected in the architecture of its homes, and the Victorian homes built in Webb City when the town was young, are testimony to the success enjoyed by the mine owners. Many of the homes are mammoth structures, rising three stories high. Many of these can be seen along Liberty, Pennsylvania and Ball Streets, the Webb house, home of the son of the city’s founder, is on the corner of Broadway and Liberty.

 

New multi-family complexes have been built in both the north and south sections of town. While much of the new housing and business development in Webb City is occurring south on Madison Avenue, new housing can be found northeast of the older part of town, as well.  The fact that Main Street still functions in spite of sprawling development is a healthy sign for the town.

 

Faith and Fellowship

Sunday morning in Webb City finds much of its population in their place of worship. We are an ecumenical city, with 18 denominations represented, an active Ministerial Alliance and a strong appreciation of the need for a belief system as well as an appreciation for the important role faith plays in daily living. The Praying Hands memorial, standing atop a hill in King Jack Park, illustrates the city’s sense of brotherhood, just as the original painting by Albrecht Durer was a tribute to the miner’s hands of his brother.   

 

The annual Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast is hosted by the Chamber and Ministerial Alliance. The Alliance hosts a prayer vigil around the Praying Hands throughout the day. The Ministerial Alliance coordinates a community Easter Sunrise Service, andan annual Community Thanksgiving service and Christmas baskets for the needy.

 

Denominations located in Webb City include Assemblies of God, Bible, Christian, Full Gospel, united Methodist, Pentecostal, Community of Christ, Baptist, Catholic, Church of God, Independent Christian, Nazarene, Presbyterian and non-denominational.

 

Chamber members include First Christian Church, 417-673-4258; Emmanuel Baptist, 417-673-2645; Central United Methodist, 417-673-4238; Christ’s Church of Oronogo, 417-673-3945; Sacred Heart Catholic, 417-673-4249.

 

We love it here. We think you will too.


Webb City Clubs & Organizations

 

Alpha Delta Kappa Teachers Sorority – Kathy Casella – 417-781-1080

Amaranth – Praying Hands Court #15 – Opal Anderson – 417-673-1435

American Legion Post 322 – 417-673-1474

Boy Scouts -  Pack 29 – Charlie Tyndall – 417-673-5736                                            Troop 25 – Terry Nations – 417-673-2281

Cruise Night –Webb City Chamber – 417-673-1154

City Parks – Reservations, contact City of Webb City – 417-673-4651

Eastern Star – Janis Jackson – 417-673-3000

Elks Club – 417-673-3671

Friends of the Library – Lisa Sweet – 417-673-3790

Friends of the Webb City Farmers Market – 417-673-5866

Girl Scouts – Troops for girls aged 5 through 417–623-8277

The Grubby Gardeners – Nancy Carlson – 417-673-5811

Historical Society –Lisa Sweet -

Mining Days Committee – Mendy Preston – 417-673-2979

MO Governor’s Mounted Guard –Terry Quarles– 417-529-7706

Rotary – Bob Collier – 417-673-7078

SWMO Electric Railroad Association - Jerry Fisher- 417-850-1721

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7630 – 417-673-3181

Webb City Area Chamber of Commerce –417- 673-1154

Webb City Youth Baseball – Shauna Friend –417-439-6686

Webb City Youth Basketball - Scott Hallacy - 417-438-2588

Webb City Youth Cheerleading – Kim Goldin wcyc_cards1@yahoo.com

Webb City Youth Flag Football - Mike Miller -417-673-3998

Webb City Youth Football –Scott Adams –417-439-6199 or cadams@ckt.net

   www.webbcityyouthfootball.com

Webb City Youth Soccer - Christy Philpot - 417-483-7755

   www.webbcitysoccerclub.com

Webb City Youth Softball – Bay Carrier - 417-629-2353

Webb City Youth T-Ball - Shauna Friend - 417-439-6686

Webb City Youth Wrestling – Jennifer Weaver – 417-673-8791

Welcome Club – Monica Vaughn – 417-673-0220

Rental spaces for special occasions

The Clubhouse, located at 115 North Madison, is owned by the Webb City Historical Society.  Two rooms on the first floor, one large room on the second floor and a commercial kitchen are available for rent.  Each first floor room is large enough to seat up to 35 people.  The rental rate is $40 for one first floor room, $70 for two first floor rooms and $150 for the first and second floor rooms.  Rentals are per day from 9 a.m. to midnight.  The newly renovated building was originally built as the Clubhouse for the employees of the Southwest Missouri Electric Railroad.  This is the perfect place for small gatherings and larger receptions in an historic setting.  For reservation information, contact Eileen Nichols at 673-5866 or 417-483-8139.

The Mining Days Community Building located in King Jack Park is ideal for larger gatherings with seating for over 100 diners.  The newly constructed facility boasts a commercial kitchen, a meeting area of 2,400 square feet, and expansive views of the park.  For reservation and fee information, contact 673-4651. 

The Amphitheater is located adjacent to the Mining Days Community Building and features a covered raised stage.  Seating for 350 can be expanded to 650 by using the lawns.  For reservation and fee information, contact 673-4651. 

Route 66 Events Center, 21 S Webb, can seat up to 150 diners and 300 theater style. For reservation and fee information contact 673-4651.

Webb City Senior Center, 210 Pennsylvania, can seat up to 125 persons in its newly remodeled dining room.  For rental costs and more information, contact 673-1876. 

Granny Shaffer’s Restaurant, 2728 North Rangeline, has three rooms available for private use.  The Route 66 room seats up to 20 people.  Granny’s Parlor seats up to 45.  The Trolley Room seats up to 125.  There is no room rental charge for the rooms if meals are ordered through the restaurant.  For information, contact Mike Wiggins at 659-9393. 

The Continental Banquet Center is located just east of Granny Shaffer’s and can seat 175 diners.  The space is suitable for receptions of up to 225.  The center has a dance floor available and is licensed to serve liquor.  An outdoor wedding setting is also available.  There is no charge to use of the facility if catering is ordered through Continental Catering.   For information, contact Mike Wiggins at 659-9393. 

City Pointe has a private meeting room for up to 80 people .  For more information contact Matt Vogel at 673-7272.



 
BUSINESS   |   COMMUNITY   |   ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT   |   EDUCATION   |   HOUSING
Webb City Area Chamber of Commerce
Address: 112 W Broadway   Webb City, MO 64870  | Phone: (417) 673-1154 | Email:
info@webbcitychamber.com